Community Service

I have been  on the Program Committee for the following conferences/workshops:

Teaching

I have been a Course Lecturer for the following courses at McGill University:

I have been a Teaching Assistant for the following courses at McGill University:

Awards

I have received the following awards during my studies (M.Sc. and Ph.D.):

  • Baden-Württemberg Stipendium (2012)
  • Differential Fee Waiver Award (2013)
  • McGill School of Computer Science Graduate Excellence Award (2013)
  • McGill School of Computer Science Graduate Excellence Award (2015)

Latest Publications

  • Céline Bensoussan, Matthias Schöttle, and Jörg Kienzle. Associations in MDE: A Concern-Oriented, Reusable Solution. In Modelling foundations and applications – 12th european conference, ECMFA 2016, held as part of STAF 2016, vienna, austria, july 6-7, 2016, proceedings, pages 121-137. Springer International Publishing, 2016.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [DOI] [Download PDF]

    Associations play an important role in model-driven software development. This paper describes a framework that uses Concern-Oriented Reuse (CORE) to capture many different kinds of associations, their properties, behaviour, and various implementation solutions within a reusable artifact: the Association concern. The concern exploits aspect-oriented modelling techniques to modularize the structure and behaviour required for enforcing uniqueness, multiplicity constraints and referential integrity for bidirectional associations. Furthermore, it packages different collection implementation classes that can be used to realize associations. For each implementation class, the impact of its use on non-functional qualities, e.g., memory consumption and performance, has been determined experimentally and formalized. We show how the class diagram notation, i.e., its metamodel and visual representation, can be extended to support reusing the Association concern, and present enhancements to automate feature selection and customization mappings to maximally streamline the reuse process in modelling tools.

    @InProceedings{ECMFA/Bensoussan2016,
    author = {C{\'{e}}line Bensoussan and Matthias Sch{\"{o}}ttle and J{\"{o}}rg Kienzle},
    title = {{Associations in MDE: A Concern-Oriented, Reusable Solution}},
    booktitle = {Modelling Foundations and Applications - 12th European Conference, {ECMFA} 2016, Held as Part of {STAF} 2016, Vienna, Austria, July 6-7, 2016, Proceedings},
    year = {2016},
    pages = {121--137},
    publisher = {Springer International Publishing},
    abstract = {Associations play an important role in model-driven software development. This paper describes a framework that uses Concern-Oriented Reuse (CORE) to capture many different kinds of associations, their properties, behaviour, and various implementation solutions within a reusable artifact: the Association concern. The concern exploits aspect-oriented modelling techniques to modularize the structure and behaviour required for enforcing uniqueness, multiplicity constraints and referential integrity for bidirectional associations. Furthermore, it packages different collection implementation classes that can be used to realize associations. For each implementation class, the impact of its use on non-functional qualities, e.g., memory consumption and performance, has been determined experimentally and formalized. We show how the class diagram notation, i.e., its metamodel and visual representation, can be extended to support reusing the Association concern, and present enhancements to automate feature selection and customization mappings to maximally streamline the reuse process in modelling tools.},
    doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-42061-5_8}
    }
  • Jörg Kienzle, Gunter Mussbacher, Omar Alam, Matthias Schöttle, Nicolas Belloir, Philippe Collet, Benoît Combemale, Julien DeAntoni, Jacques Klein, and Bernhard Rumpe. VCU: The Three Dimensions of Reuse. In Software Reuse: Bridging with Social-Awareness – 15th International Conference, ICSR 2016, Limassol, Cyprus, June 5-7, 2016, Proceedings, pages 122-137. Springer International Publishing, 2016.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [DOI]

    Reuse, enabled by modularity and interfaces, is one of the most important concepts in software engineering. This is evidenced by an increasingly large number of reusable artifacts, ranging from small units such as classes to larger, more sophisticated units such as components, services, frameworks, software product lines, and concerns. This paper presents evidence that a canonical set of reuse interfaces has emerged over time: the variation, customization, and usage interfaces (VCU). A reusable artifact that provides all three interfaces reaches the highest potential of reuse, as it explicitly exposes how the artifact can be manipulated during the reuse process along these three dimensions. We demonstrate the wide applicability of the VCU interfaces along two axes: across abstraction layers of a system specification and across existing reuse techniques. The former is shown with the help of a comprehensive case study including reusable requirements, software, and hardware models for the authorization domain. The latter is shown with a discussion on how the VCU interfaces relate to existing reuse techniques.

    @InProceedings{ICSR/Kienzle2016,
    author = {J{\"{o}}rg Kienzle and Gunter Mussbacher and Omar Alam and Matthias Sch{\"{o}}ttle and Nicolas Belloir and Philippe Collet and Beno{\^{\i}}t Combemale and Julien DeAntoni and Jacques Klein and Bernhard Rumpe},
    title = {{VCU: The Three Dimensions of Reuse}},
    booktitle = {{Software Reuse: Bridging with Social-Awareness - 15th International Conference, {ICSR} 2016, Limassol, Cyprus, June 5-7, 2016, Proceedings}},
    year = {2016},
    pages = {122--137},
    publisher = {Springer International Publishing},
    abstract = {Reuse, enabled by modularity and interfaces, is one of the most important concepts in software engineering. This is evidenced by an increasingly large number of reusable artifacts, ranging from small units such as classes to larger, more sophisticated units such as components, services, frameworks, software product lines, and concerns. This paper presents evidence that a canonical set of reuse interfaces has emerged over time: the variation, customization, and usage interfaces (VCU). A reusable artifact that provides all three interfaces reaches the highest potential of reuse, as it explicitly exposes how the artifact can be manipulated during the reuse process along these three dimensions. We demonstrate the wide applicability of the VCU interfaces along two axes: across abstraction layers of a system specification and across existing reuse techniques. The former is shown with the help of a comprehensive case study including reusable requirements, software, and hardware models for the authorization domain. The latter is shown with a discussion on how the VCU interfaces relate to existing reuse techniques.},
    doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-35122-3_9}
    }
  • Matthias Schöttle, Omar Alam, Jörg Kienzle, and Gunter Mussbacher. On the Modularization Provided by Concern-Oriented Reuse. In Companion Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Modularity, MODULARITY Companion 2016, pages 184-189. ACM, 2016.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [DOI] [Download PDF]

    Reuse is essential in modern software engineering, and hence also in the context of model-driven engineering (MDE). Concern-Oriented Reuse (CORE) proposes a new way of structuring model-driven software development where models of the system are modularized by domains of abstraction within units of reuse called concerns. Within a concern, models are further decomposed and modularized by views and features. High-level concerns can reuse lower-level concerns, and models within a concern can extend other models belonging to the same concern, resulting in complex inter- and intra-concern dependencies. To clearly specify what dependencies are allowed between models belonging to the same or to different concerns, CORE advocates a three-part interface to describe each concern (variation, customization, and usage interfaces). This paper presents the CORE metamodel that formalizes the CORE concepts and enables the integration of different mod- elling languages within the CORE framework.

    @InProceedings{MOMO/Schoettle2016,
    author = {Matthias Sch{\"{o}}ttle and Omar Alam and J{\"{o}}rg Kienzle and Gunter Mussbacher},
    title = {{On the Modularization Provided by Concern-Oriented Reuse}},
    booktitle = {{Companion Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Modularity}},
    year = {2016},
    series = {MODULARITY Companion 2016},
    pages = {184--189},
    publisher = {ACM},
    abstract = {Reuse is essential in modern software engineering, and hence also in the context of model-driven engineering (MDE). Concern-Oriented Reuse (CORE) proposes a new way of structuring model-driven software development where models of the system are modularized by domains of abstraction within units of reuse called concerns. Within a concern, models are further decomposed and modularized by views and features. High-level concerns can reuse lower-level concerns, and models within a concern can extend other models belonging to the same concern, resulting in complex inter- and intra-concern dependencies. To clearly specify what dependencies are allowed between models belonging to the same or to different concerns, CORE advocates a three-part interface to describe each concern (variation, customization, and usage interfaces). This paper presents the CORE metamodel that formalizes the CORE concepts and enables the integration of different mod- elling languages within the CORE framework.},
    doi = {10.1145/2892664.2892697},
    location = {M{\'{a}}laga, Spain}
    }

[View All Publications]